Admissions to the Bar by Examination and by Transferred UBE Score, 2016–2020

NOTE: Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, most jurisdictions made modifications to their July 2020 bar exam administrations, some of which have implications for the admissions statistics in the chart below. Please note the following. (See “COVID-19: Implications for 2020 Statistics”  for details.)

• The number of 2020 admissions by transferred UBE score also includes those admitted by score transfer agreements among certain UBE jurisdictions that administered NCBE’s remote testing option on October 5–6 instead of or in addition to the July or alternative-date 2020 UBE.

• Five jurisdictions adopted emergency diploma privilege/examination waiver rules allowing certain qualified candidates to be eligible for admission to the bar in that jurisdiction without taking the bar examination. These jurisdictions and their number of diploma privilege/examination waiver admissions in 2020 are as follows: District of Columbia (0, applications not accepted until 2021), Louisiana (409), Oregon (240), Utah (130), and Washington (498).

• Thirty-one jurisdictions expanded or adopted temporary supervised practice rules to allow qualified candidates to engage in the limited practice of law under the supervision of a licensed attorney until they were able to take the bar exam.

• Some jurisdictions experienced delays in 2020 admissions (such as delayed swearing-in ceremonies or delayed applicant submission of paperwork) such that certain admission requirements were not fulfilled until early 2021. As these delays were solely due to the COVID-19 pandemic, these admissions are still included in this chart as 2020 admissions.

*Individuals admitted in New Hampshire via the University of New Hampshire’s Daniel Webster Scholar (DWS) Honors Program are not included in this chart. The number of individuals admitted in New Hampshire via the DWS Program in 2016–2020 are as follows: 24 in 2016, 17 in 2017, 20 in 2018, 18 in 2019, and 21 in 2020. (The DWS Honors Program, a two-year performance-based program to which students are accepted prior to their second year of law school, allows successful students to be admitted to the New Hampshire Bar without taking the traditional bar examination.)†Individuals admitted in Wisconsin via diploma privilege are not included in this chart. The number of individuals admitted in Wisconsin via diploma privilege in 2016–2020 are as follows: 351 in 2016, 347 in 2017, 351 in 2018, 327 in 2019, and 299 in 2020. (Wisconsin’s diploma privilege rule allows graduates of its in-state ABA-accredited law schools eligibility for admission without taking the traditional bar examination.)

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*Individuals admitted in New Hampshire via the University of New Hampshire’s Daniel Webster Scholar (DWS) Honors Program are not included in this chart. The number of individuals admitted in New Hampshire via the DWS Program in 2016–2020 are as follows: 24 in 2016, 17 in 2017, 20 in 2018, 18 in 2019, and 21 in 2020. (The DWS Honors Program, a two-year performance-based program to which students are accepted prior to their second year of law school, allows successful students to be admitted to the New Hampshire Bar without taking the traditional bar examination.)

†Individuals admitted in Wisconsin via diploma privilege are not included in this chart. The number of individuals admitted in Wisconsin via diploma privilege in 2016–2020 are as follows: 351 in 2016, 347 in 2017, 351 in 2018, 327 in 2019, and 299 in 2020. (Wisconsin’s diploma privilege rule allows graduates of its in-state ABA-accredited law schools eligibility for admission without taking the traditional bar examination.)

*Individuals admitted in New Hampshire via the University of New Hampshire’s Daniel Webster Scholar (DWS) Honors Program are not included in this chart. The number of individuals admitted in New Hampshire via the DWS Program in 2016–2020 are as follows: 24 in 2016, 17 in 2017, 20 in 2018, 18 in 2019, and 21 in 2020. (The DWS Honors Program, a two-year performance-based program to which students are accepted prior to their second year of law school, allows successful students to be admitted to the New Hampshire Bar without taking the traditional bar examination.)

†Individuals admitted in Wisconsin via diploma privilege are not included in this chart. The number of individuals admitted in Wisconsin via diploma privilege in 2016–2020 are as follows: 351 in 2016, 347 in 2017, 351 in 2018, 327 in 2019, and 299 in 2020. (Wisconsin’s diploma privilege rule allows graduates of its in-state ABA-accredited law schools eligibility for admission without taking the traditional bar examination.)