The following is a description of Figure 5: Helpfulness of hiring criteria in hiring new lawyers with the desired foundations from Foundations for Practice: The “Whole Lawyer” and the Path to Competency for New Lawyers.

The helpfulness of hiring criteria in hiring new lawyers with the desired foundations:

  • Legal employment was found very helpful by 54.2% of respondents, somewhat helpful by 34.2%, neither helpful nor unhelpful by 6.2%, somewhat unhelpful by 2.9%, and very unhelpful by 2.6%.
  • Recommendations from practitioners or judges were found very helpful by 42.5% of respondents, somewhat helpful by 39.4%, neither helpful nor unhelpful by 12.0%, somewhat unhelpful by 3.3%, and very unhelpful by 2.8%.
  • Legal externship was found very helpful by 40.1% of respondents, somewhat helpful by 41.4%, neither helpful nor unhelpful by 12.3%, somewhat unhelpful by 3.7%, and very unhelpful by 2.5%.
  • Other experiential education was found very helpful by 31,7% of respondents, somewhat helpful by 47.7%, neither helpful nor unhelpful by 15.1%, somewhat unhelpful by 3.6%, and very unhelpful by 1.9%.
  • Life experience between college and law school was found very helpful by 29.6% of respondents, somewhat helpful by 48.7%, neither helpful nor unhelpful by 15.6%, somewhat unhelpful by 3.7%, and very unhelpful by 2.4%.
  • Participation in a law school clinic was found very helpful by 31.9% of respondents, somewhat helpful by 45.4%, neither helpful nor unhelpful by 16.5%, somewhat unhelpful by 3.9%, and very unhelpful by 2.3%.\
  • Federal court clerkship was found very helpful by 34.4% of respondents, somewhat helpful by 40.4%, neither helpful nor unhelpful by 18.5%, somewhat unhelpful by 3.7%, and very unhelpful by 2.9%.
  • State court clerkship was found very helpful by 26.8% of respondents, somewhat helpful by 46.4%, neither helpful nor unhelpful by 20.3%, somewhat unhelpful by 4.0%, and very unhelpful by 2.4%.
  • Law school courses in a particular specialty were found very helpful by 20.8% of respondents, somewhat helpful by 49.5%, neither helpful nor unhelpful by 22.9%, somewhat unhelpful by 4.3%, and very unhelpful by 2.5%.
  • Recommendations from professors were found very helpful by 17.1% of respondents, somewhat helpful by 46.1%, neither helpful nor unhelpful by 28.2%, somewhat unhelpful by 5.5%, and very unhelpful by 3.1%.
  • Class rank was found very helpful by 16.5% of respondents, somewhat helpful by 46.0%, neither helpful nor unhelpful by 25.9%, somewhat unhelpful by 6.4%, and very unhelpful by 5.2%.
  • Law school attended was found very helpful by 16.8% of respondents, somewhat helpful by 44.3%, neither helpful nor unhelpful by 28.1%, somewhat unhelpful by 5.6%, and very unhelpful by 5.2%.
  • Law school certification in a particular area was found very helpful by 17.3% of respondents, somewhat helpful by 42.8%, neither helpful nor unhelpful by 31.8%, somewhat unhelpful by 5.0%, and very unhelpful by 3.1%.
  • Extra-curricular activities were found very helpful by 9.0% of respondents, somewhat helpful by 49.7%, neither helpful nor unhelpful by 32.6%, somewhat unhelpful by 5.8%, and very unhelpful by 2.9%.
  • Ties to a particular geographic location were found very helpful by 18.0% of respondents, somewhat helpful by 36.3%, neither helpful nor unhelpful by 37.9%, somewhat unhelpful by 4.4%, and very unhelpful by 3.4%.
  • Law review experience was found very helpful by 11.8% of respondents, somewhat helpful by 39.4%, neither helpful nor unhelpful by 35.0%, somewhat unhelpful by 7.0%, and very unhelpful by 6.8%.
  • Journal experience was found very helpful by 9.2% of respondents, somewhat helpful by 38.8%, neither helpful nor unhelpful by 38.2%, somewhat unhelpful by 7.0%, and very unhelpful by 6.8%.